Zoom purchases security service to address security concerns and introduce end-to-end encryption

Zoom purchases online security service to address security concerns and introduce end-to-end encryption

  • The platform acquired Keybase in order to strengthen security
  • The acquisition of Zoom will help it introduce end-to-end encryption
  • Stronger encryption will require modification of some Zoom features
  • Acquisition Part of Zoom’s 90-Day Commitment to Strengthen Security

Zoom bought a security and encryption company called Keybase in an effort to resolve its highly publicized security concerns and bring its expertise to its increasingly popular platform.

Keybase will help the videoconferencing platform to implement end-to-end encryption designed to protect user data and privacy and strengthen its current security measures after the company incorrectly claimed that its service uses full encryption .

Details of the agreement, including the purchase price, have not been made public.

Zoom has acquired the security company Keybase in order to strengthen its security measures and contribute to the end-to-end encryption of its platform (stock)

Zoom has acquired the security company Keybase in order to strengthen its security measures and contribute to the end-to-end encryption of its platform (stock)

CNBC reports that encrypted information will not be stored on Zoom’s servers and a new, more robust system will prevent meeting attendees from calling by phone and disable cloud call recordings when end-to-end encryption is enabled.

Once introduced, the Zoom user initiating a call can activate end-to-end encryption before starting a meeting.

The move will increase recently introduced security features, including the ability to lock meetings and prevent other users from joining, the ability to remove meeting participants, and better control over screen sharing.

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Zoom has previously said it will release details on this encryption at the end of the month, but has not said when end-to-end encryption will be available.

As indicated by The edge, Keybase was launched in 2014 and offers a multitude of security services, including encrypted messaging and file sharing. The company originally started out as a directory for public encryption keys.

The company mainly serves as an encrypted database that verifies the online identity of users.

The acquisition of Keybase is part of a 90-day plan from Zoom that aims to remedy a series of security concerns.

The company has paused new features and said that its engineering resources will now be devoted entirely to improving service security.

Zoom has been criticized for several security breaches in recent months. In the photo, Eric Yuan, CEO of Zoom, seen here during the company's IPO in New York last April

Zoom has been criticized for several security breaches in recent months. In the photo, Eric Yuan, CEO of Zoom, seen here during the company's IPO in New York last April

Zoom has been criticized for several security breaches in recent months. In the photo, Eric Yuan, CEO of Zoom, seen here during the company’s IPO in New York last April

To help increase transparency, Zoom said it would also provide periodic reports on law enforcement requests for data, records or content and “ improve ” its current bug bonus program which pays ethical hackers for researching and reporting loopholes in its code.

Zoom was bogged down by several security concerns during its recent surge in popularity, including revelations in March that it was harming sensitive data with Facebook, including the hours of operation of the Zoom app, phone operators , device specifications, location, and other analytics that previously targeted ads.

Other flaws discovered in Zoom also compromise webcam privacy, allowing hackers to tap into video and audio streams, and another issue that allows hackers to steal passwords on Windows devices.

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