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Robots used in Irish hospital “so nurses can spend more time caring for patients”

Mater Misericordiae University Hospital in Dublin will now have robots that quickly process the administrative and IT tasks that nurses normally perform (stock photo)

Robots used in Irish hospital to perform basic administrative tasks “so nurses can spend more time treating patients with coronavirus”

  • UiPath Software Company Partners with Mater Misericordiae University Hospital
  • They will quickly go through basic administrative tasks to free nurses
  • We hope they can spend more time caring for patients
  • Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should you see a doctor?

A hospital in Ireland uses state-of-the-art software to help nurses free up as much time as possible with patients during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Mater Misericordiae University Hospital in Dublin will now have robots that quickly process the administrative and IT tasks that nurses normally do.

It is hoped that by giving nurses more time, they will be able to spend it alongside critically ill patients who are fighting COVID-19.

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Mater Misericordiae University Hospital in Dublin will now have robots that quickly process the administrative and IT tasks that nurses normally perform (stock photo)

Software developers at UiPath have developed a system that will speed up the often awkward processes inside the healthcare system.

It is hoped that by making computers do most of the mundane administrative tasks, they can spend up to 50% more time with patients.

The technology will also speed up the process of analyzing and reporting COVID-19 test results to patients and organizations around the world.

Jincy Jerry, Deputy Director of Hospital Infection Prevention and Control, said: “Since IBD nurses have been spending almost 30% of their day on administrative tasks for the past few months, I’m looking for ways to create software robots are part of our daily tasks.

“ With the COVID-19 pandemic unfolding now, it is crucial that all frontline staff be released as much as possible to spend time with patients and deal with this epidemic, rather than being in front of computers.

“Not only will automation help with this, but it will also ease the pressure on the hospital as it continues to process huge amounts of more routine patient data in addition to information specific to Covid-19.”

Software developers at UiPath have developed a system that will speed up often awkward systems inside the healthcare system. It is hoped that by making computers do most of the mundane administrative tasks, they can spend up to 50% more time with patients.

Software developers at UiPath have developed a system that will speed up often awkward systems inside the healthcare system. It is hoped that by making computers do most of the mundane administrative tasks, they can spend up to 50% more time with patients.

“As we have already seen, alongside the public playing its role in physical distancing, rapid diagnosis and appropriate self-isolation are essential to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

“We are confident that the project we are embarking on will help to alleviate the enormous pressure this epidemic is putting on healthcare organizations – not just in MMHU, but across Ireland.”

Mark O’Connor, director of public sector for Ireland at UiPath, added: “ With one robot for each nursing approach, essential front line staff will be set free to be nurses and not system administrators, being able focus more on quality of care – which can make a real difference in treating patients when needed. “

The hospital move comes as robot experts say the machines could be trained to disinfect surfaces, take temperatures and collect pads.

Adding new functionality to robots would automate “boring, dirty and dangerous tasks”.

In an editorial for a scientific journal, Howie Choset of Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh and other signers write: “ Experiences from the Ebola outbreak (2015) have identified a wide range of use cases [for robots]”Wrote the team.

“Many of these applications would help reduce the risk of direct human exposure to disease.

“But funding multidisciplinary research in partnership with agencies and industry to respond to these use cases remains expensive, scarce and intended for other applications.”

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