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Rare fully-functional Apple-1 computer sells for $ 458,711 at auction in Boston

A rare, fully functional Apple-1 computer, shown, sold for $ 458,711 at auction in Boston

Rare, fully functional Apple-1 computer – launched by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak in 1976 – sells for $ 458,711 at auction in Boston

  • Apple-1 machine was the first product sold by Apple Computer
  • Once a museum piece, the unit has been restored to fully function
  • It was auctioned off with an original Apple-1 cassette interface, also from 1979
  • Apple designer Jerry Manock’s sale was also presented

A rare fully functional Apple-1 computer sold for $ 458,711 at its Boston auction this week.

The Apple-1 was the first product developed under the name of Apple by the co-founders of the company Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak and launched in 1976.

Along with the pioneer product, the auction also saw the sale of the lifetime collection of Apple product design engineer Jerry Manock.

The collection includes a PowerBook Macintosh signed by Steve Jobs that sold for $ 12,671 (£ 10,284) and a neon Apple logo that cost $ 1,915 (£ 1,554).

Meanwhile, a “ think different ” watch from the brand’s famous advertising campaign sold for $ 1,375 (£ 1,116).

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A rare, fully functional Apple-1 computer, shown, sold for $ 458,711 at auction in Boston

The Apple-1 was the first product developed under the name of Apple by the co-founders of the company Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak and launched in 1976

The Apple-1 was the first product developed under the name of Apple by the co-founders of the company Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak and launched in 1976

“The Apple-1 is not only a marvel of early computer ingenuity, but the product that launched what is today one of the most valuable and successful businesses in the world,” said the executive vice president of RR Auction, Bobby Livingston.

Far from modern Apple offerings, the Apple-1 was originally designed as a kit to be sold to electronics enthusiasts and members of the so-called Palo Alto Homebrew Computer Club.

However, the machine became one of the first computers not to require welding by the end user when Paul Terrell – owner of the first personal computer store “ The Byte Shop ” in Mountain View, California, has agreed to purchase 50 fully assembled units for sale.

In total, around 200 Apple-1 machines were produced, including MM. Jobs and Wozniak sold 175 in total.

This particular machine was acquired by the West Michigan computer store, SoftWarehouse, in the 1980s as part of the trade in a newer IBM machine, then displayed in store in a custom storefront before finishing. by being stored.

The unit was restored last year by Apple-1 expert Corey Cohen and exhibited at the Vintage Computer Festival West 2019 in California.

The machine is fully functional and can run for eight hours without fail.

The bundle was sold with an original 1976 Apple-1 cassette interface, which allowed the computer to save data to standard audio tape and reload it into memory at a later time.

The interface was revolutionary in its time, relying on only six integrated circuits rather than the usual 50 to 100 and yet operating about four times faster.

Far from modern Apple offerings, the Apple-1 was originally designed as a kit to be sold to electronics enthusiasts and members of the so-called Palo Alto Homebrew Computer Club. However, the machine became one of the first computers not to require end-user soldering when Paul Terrell - owner of the first personal computer store `` The Byte Shop '' in Mountain View, California - agreed to buy 50 fully assembled units for sale

Far from modern Apple offerings, the Apple-1 was originally designed as a kit to be sold to electronics enthusiasts and members of the so-called Palo Alto Homebrew Computer Club. However, the machine became one of the first computers not to require end-user soldering when Paul Terrell – owner of the first personal computer store “ The Byte Shop ” in Mountain View, California – agreed to buy 50 fully assembled units for sale

This particular machine was acquired by the West Michigan computer store, SoftWarehouse, in the 1980s as part of the trade in a newer IBM machine, then displayed in store in a custom storefront before finishing. by being stored. The unit was restored last year by Apple-1 expert Corey Cohen and exhibited at the Vintage Computer Festival West 2019 in California. The machine is fully functional and can run for eight hours without fail

This particular machine was acquired by the West Michigan computer store, SoftWarehouse, in the 1980s as part of the trade in a newer IBM machine, then displayed in store in a custom storefront before finishing. by being stored. The unit was restored last year by Apple-1 expert Corey Cohen and exhibited at the Vintage Computer Festival West 2019 in California. The machine is fully functional and can run for eight hours without fail

The Apple-1 paved the way for the development of the more advanced Apple II in early 1977, which came in a plastic case with an integrated keyboard.

The sale of the Apple II and its accessories and software increased Apple Computer’s annual sales from $ 774,000 to $ 118 million in just three years.

The so-called “Steve Jobs auction” took place from March 5 to 12.

JERRY MANOCK LIFE COLLECTION AUCTION HIGHLIGHTS

In the photo, Jerry Manock (left)

In the photo, Jerry Manock (left)

Along with the pioneer product, the auction also saw the sale of the lifetime collection of Apple product design engineer Jerry Manock.

Mr. Manock was responsible for product design for the Apple II, Apple III, Apple Lisa, and early Macintosh computers – as well as the Disk II and Disk III diskette subsystems.

Lot 6006: Macintosh PowerBook signed by Steve Jobs

Sold for: $ 12,671 (£ 10,284)

Lot 6005: neon sign with Apple logo, from 1989

Sold for: $ 1,915 (£ 1,554)

Rare fully-functional Apple-1 computer sells for $ 458,711 at auction in Boston

Lot 6009: Apple bonus memo, signed by Steve Jobs

Sold for: $ 15,307 (£ 12,431)

Rare fully-functional Apple-1 computer sells for $ 458,711 at auction in Boston

Lot 6007: Apple watch “Think different”

Sold for: $ 1,375 (£ 1,116)

Rare fully-functional Apple-1 computer sells for $ 458,711 at auction in Boston

Lot 6013: Apple Macintosh 128K computer with an “ Appreciation: Jerry Manock ” plaque on the back

Lot 6008: original bonded blue iMac vinyl banner

Rare fully-functional Apple-1 computer sells for $ 458,711 at auction in Boston

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