COVID-19 | Coronavirus

baptism of fire for medical students

At the ambulatory center for infectious diseases for patients with Covid-19, in Lille, March 18.
At the ambulatory center for infectious diseases for patients with Covid-19, in Lille, March 18. PASCAL BONNIERE / PHOTOPQR / VOICE OF THE NORTH / MAXPPP

At the Edouard-Herriot hospital in Lyon, everyone is preparing for the arrival of an influx of patients with Covid-19. “It’s a bit calm before the storm, we expect a huge wave”, says Lucas Reynaud, intern in the intensive care unit, and head of the Autonomous Syndicate of Lyon hospital interns. “The neighbors of the Croix-Rousse are starting to fill up, it will soon be our turn”, says the young man in the ninth grade. Like his internal comrades, medical students at the end of their studies and already in charge in hospitals, he saw the coronavirus crisis at the forefront.

“We are a little scared, but we say that we are studying for that, to live through these periods, says the 30-year-old intern. I’m an emergency room doctor, we’re really going to do something. “ A “Pool” is already ready to relay if necessary: ​​300 interns answered the call launched by the Hospices Civils de Lyon, he reports, “There is a lot of solidarity”. He is chained up with meetings and trainings, for example to be ready to intubate with protective clothing. “It’s like intubating with armor …”, he describes.

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But as with their elders, new and difficult questions are already mounting among these young doctors: what screening strategy should be adopted when there is a lack of “Reactive” ? What protection do you have when you lack equipment? What will happen if there is a need to sort between patients? “It’s terrible if we have to choose who should live or die …”, points out the intern from Lyon.

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“Everyone gets out of their comfort zone”

For Baptiste Caylar, intern in an infectious disease internship in Chambéry, the questions around what is now called the “Prioritization” should not be asked in these terms. “There will be a protocol, and I trust my leaders, this sorting, it will not be up to us to do it alone. ” Even if the young man feels it: “We’re coming into the unknown a bit, we don’t know if we can still have a chef on the phone. “

“We’re coming into the unknown a bit, we don’t know if we can still have a chef on the phone. “

In his service, if so far, the situation was relatively calm, with “Minor cases” in the 32 beds now reserved for infected patients, “We start to feel the pressure build up”he said, citing the arrival of a dozen patients, now all on oxygen. “As an intern, we feel able to manage these cases, he judges, but it’s the amount of people who could arrive at the same time is frightening. ” All are looking with terror towards the regions already strongly affected, like the Great East, whose testimonies of interns who go back to them are “Chilling”. All hope that the containment measures imposed by the government earlier this week will help limit the tide.

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