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“Avoid using the microwave for a faster Internet connection,” says Ofcom

If you want to get the most out of your home broadband connection, don

According to Ofcom, for the best Internet speed when you work at home while locking out the coronavirus, you should avoid using the microwave.

The regulator has published seven tips for staying connected while locking on its website, including performing regular speed checks on your connection.

There has been an increase in Internet use while people are working at home, children are at home from school and others are fighting isolation by broadcasting TV shows and movies .

Ofcom says “ do not use the microwave to make video calls, watch HD videos or do anything important online ” as this reduces the strength of the wifi signal.

The council intervenes as the UK enters the second day of closure, with shops closed, rallies of more than two people banned and people invited to stay indoors.

Ofcom’s seven tips include only using landlines or wifi to make phone calls – rather than blocking the mobile network with voice calls and keeping broadband routers away from other wireless devices such as televisions, speakers and baby monitors.

If you want to get the most out of your home broadband connection, don’t turn on the microwave, explains Ofcom in his seven tips for a better connection. (Stock Image)

There has been an increase in Internet demand during the day as people work from home and children study at home due to the shutdown of the coronavirus

There has been an increase in Internet demand during the day as people work from home and children study at home due to the shutdown of the coronavirus

THE SEVEN BROADBAND ADVICE OF OFCOM

1. Use your landline or wifi calls

You can configure your phone to make calls over your wifi network rather than the mobile network.

2. Move your router away from devices

Placing your broadband router next to cordless phones, baby headsets, lamps, dimmers, televisions, and more can affect your speed.

3. Lower requirements on your connection

Do not watch HD movies or TV shows, play computer games, download videos, or make video calls at the same time.

4. Try wired rather than wireless

If possible, connect directly to your router rather than using wifi.

5. Plug directly into the telephone jack

Don’t use an extension cord to connect your router to your phone’s outlet – go straight into the port.

6. Test your broadband line

Check your speed using online speed tests to see if it matches what you expect or paid for.

7. Ask your ISP for advice

If all else fails, contact your broadband provider – but expect a long wait due to coronavirus.

Ofcom says the advice it has shared is designed to help people manage their data usage and ensure everyone at home has the bandwidth they need.

The regulator said it would help people “be it for video streaming, virtual meetings or voice calls”.

“Broadband and mobile networks are in increased demand due to the coronavirus (Covid-19),” Ofcom wrote in a blog post.

“We can all play our part in helping to manage the way we use our connections.”

BT Openreach said it has seen a 20% increase in internet use in the past week as more people stay at home due to COVID-19.

The company says the network can cope and even though there has been an increase in its use, it is still lower than the usual evening peaks.

An Openreach spokesperson said: “We don’t see any significant problems on our broadband or telephone network.”

The spokesperson told the BBC: “We have seen an increase of approximately 20% in daytime use on our fiber optic network, but this meets our expectations and is not as high as the levels of use that we see during daylight hours. evening break. “

Broadband and mobile companies have started to remove data limits from user accounts or to add additional data to make working at home easier.

BT said that a few days after the announcement to work from home where possible, they found an increase of up to 60% in day use.

Vodafone and TalkTalk said they have also seen a similar increase in demand.

Users have started to report that their internet connection has become slower and slower than normal – with broadband.co.uk averaging speeds of 44.6 Mbps.

A spokesperson for the online broadband website said: ‘[The figure] confirms no negative change in the speeds people are getting despite the change in working arrangements in the UK.

“So really, the message is to stay calm and keep downloading, the broadband network can handle it!”

This prompted Ofcom to publish its advice for improving broadband connections, as many factors in the speed of broadband connections are at home.

Ofcom said, “Keep your router as far away from other devices and those that work wirelessly as possible.

“Cordless phones, baby monitors, halogen lights, dimmers, stereos and computer speakers, televisions and monitors can all affect your wifi if they’re too close to your router. “

Their advice also includes reducing demand on the connection, such as disabling wireless devices that you are not using – such as iPads and TVs because they always impose a demand on your connection – even when they are not not actively used.

Ofcom recommends not streaming TV, playing video games and making video calls at the same time, saying families must work together to ease the burden

Ofcom recommends not streaming TV, playing video games and making video calls at the same time, saying families must work together to ease the burden

If you make video calls or meetings, turning off video and using audio will require much less of your Internet connection, advised Ofcom.

“You may also want to manage your family’s online activity so that different people are not performing data-intensive tasks (such as HD streaming, games, or video calls) at the same time.”

The regulator also recommends using wired rather than wireless connections for essential tasks – including plugging laptops directly into the router.

You can also try plugging the router directly into the main telephone jack rather than using an extension cord – using better quality cables can also improve speeds.

“If possible, do tests over a few days and at different times of the day. A number of factors at home can affect wifi speeds, so check your provider’s website for advice on improving your signal in the home, ” Ofcom wrote.

If after all of that, your connection is still slow, Ofcom says to contact your broadband provider who should be able to give you specific advice.

“If you need to contact them for help, be aware that some companies have far fewer people to answer your questions because of the coronavirus.”

“Most prioritize vulnerable clients and essential public services, so please consider this,” said a spokesperson.

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